Posts

After hip or knee replacement when can I shower, drive, return to work, and have sex?

I decided to write this short blog on four common questions, topics I’m routinely asked about after someone has a hip or knee surgery. When is it ok to shower and get the incision wet, when it’s safe to drive, when should they plan on returning to work and the what factors drive that timing, and finally when it’s safe to resume sexual activities?

How We Manage Your Pain After Surgery

At the Leone Center for Orthopedic Care, Dr. Leone and his team are committed to giving you both the best result and the best experience. One of the major reasons our patients recover so much faster and return to full activities so much sooner than even several years ago is our comprehensive approach to preventing and preempting pain. Our goal is to “stay ahead of the pain curve”. This begins in the pre-operative holding area prior to your surgery ever starting.

Frequent Reader Questions about Hip Dislocations and Problems

In my last Q&A blog post, I shared some of the most common reader questions about knee replacement surgery. Again, I will use a Q&A format to share some of the most-frequently asked questions and concerns relating to a hip dislocation or hip subluxation, a condition in which the hip joint is partially, but not fully, dislocated.

Steps You Can Take to Ensure the Best Result and Best Experience when Having a Hip or Knee Replacement

In a previous blog, “Why Joint Replacement Patients Are Getting Well so much Faster Today,” I described the reasons why patients are getting well so much faster today than even just a few years ago. This partially is due to new and improved surgical techniques and prosthetics, as well as better pain management and prevention strategies.

Frequent Reader Questions about Hip Replacement Surgery

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Since beginning my joint replacement blog several years ago, I have received many comments and questions from readers on a variety of subjects and personal experiences. For this post, I will use a Q & A format to share some of the most-frequently asked questions and concerns about hip replacement surgery (THR).

Greater Trochanteric Bursitis: A Common Cause of Hip Pain

One of the most common sources of hip pain is greater trochanteric bursitis caused by inflammation of the bursa, which is located at the outward curve of the femur (thighbone) where it meets the hip bone.

Age Is Not the Determining Factor in Joint Replacement Surgery

Two of the most common questions we receive at The Leone Center for Orthopedic Care are, “How old is too old to have joint replacement surgery?” and “How young is too young to have Joint replacement surgery?”

Sharing Informative Questions and Comments from Our Readers

At The Leone Center for Orthopedic care, my staff and I have created a number of online platforms to provide information and answer patient questions: via email at LeoneCenter@holy-cross.com, our comprehensive website, informational blog and video gallery, both on the website and on You Tube.

Arthroscopic Techniques to Stimulate the Production of Joint Fibrocartilage

In the third blog focusing on biologic strategies to preserve, “heal” or encourage the growth of new joint cartilage, I will describe three arthroscopic techniques that deliberately cause bleeding to stimulate the development of fibrocartilage to form and cover an exposed, arthritic area in the joint.

Joint Preservation Strategies to Delay the Need for Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery

In the first of several blog posts about hip and knee joint preservation, I will discuss the mechanics of these amazing joints that help keep us moving and the conservative treatments that can delay and possibly prevent the eventual need for partial or total joint replacement.

Radio Interview: Dr. Leone discusses how he finds solutions to complex hip and knee problems.

Anita Finley, Boomer Times recently hosted Dr. William Leone…

Guest Blog: “My Experience with Hip Replacement Surgery,” by Danny More

At the Leone Center for Orthopedic Care, we treat and care for many patients who have developed problems associated with their prosthetic hips or knees. Recently, a number of specific prostheses, including a class of hip stems with modular necks, were recalled because they had been determined to cause significant problems in some individuals.