I had my hip or knee replacement and I’m still in pain. Now what? When is it time for a second opinion?

When should someone who already has had a hip or knee replacement…

When should I have my hip or knee replaced? When you’re surviving but not thriving.

Like almost everything in life, this decision is seldom black…

The Leone Center for Orthopedic Care, a ‘Destination Practice’

In 2009, Dr. William A. Leone, head of The Leone Center for Orthopedic Care at Holy Cross Hospital in Fort Lauderdale, made a compassionate and well thought-out decision, transforming the business model for his orthopedic practice.

Partial vs. Total Hip Replacement Surgery

/
Some patients in need of a hip replacement will ask me if they are candidates for a partial rather than a total hip replacement because it sounds “less invasive.” Unlike the knee (which has three distinct compartments and when one wears out there’s a good chance that only that compartment needs to be replaced), the hip is a single ball (femoral head) and joint socket (acetabulum) and a partial hip replacement often isn’t the optimum choice.

For Posterior or Anterior Total Hip Replacement Surgery, Choosing the Right Orthopedic Surgeon is What Matters Most

/
Two years ago, I posted a blog detailing the pros and cons of mini-posterior versus direct anterior total hip replacement surgery (THR). The overwhelming response to that blog article (click on the link above to view) prompted me to provide this update.

Use of a Subcuticular Suture to Close Hip and Knee Incisions and Instructions for Suture Removal

/
Many patients ask me questions about where I will place the incision and how it will be closed. While there are a variety of methods which surgeons commonly use, including sutures (also called stitches), staples and even glue, I choose to close with a single subcuticular (or intradermal) non-absorbable suture.

Hip Arthroscopy: Who is a Good Candidate?

/
Arthroscopy is a surgical technique that has revolutionized how some complex problems that develop in certain joints are treated, including the hip, knee, shoulder, ankle, elbow and wrist.

Using Sensor Technology to Diagnose and Precisely Correct TKR Failures During Revision Surgery

In the last of three blog posts on the topic of unsatisfactory results post-TKR (total knee replacement), I will discuss using kinematic sensor technology to help me more precisely diagnose and correct a painful TKR.

Why Joint Replacement Patients Are Getting Well So Much Faster Today

At The Leone Center for Orthopedic Care at Holy Cross Hospital, we see and treat people who have developed problems associated with their hips or knees.

Treat the Patient, Not the X-rays or Scans

/
In this article I will discuss the patient who has significant disability from a hip or knee, but whose workup either is not definitive or doesn’t appear “severe enough” to warrant joint replacement.

The Unhappy Total Knee Replacement Patient: Figuring out What Is Wrong

/
Unfortunately, there are a significant number of people who have undergone total knee replacement (TKR) and are not happy with the result. Some studies estimate 20% or more fall into this category. Defining success or a “satisfactory result” can mean two very different things to an individual who had the total knee versus the surgeon who implanted it.