Entries by Dr. William Leone

Treat the Patient, Not the X-rays or Scans

In this article I will discuss the patient who has significant disability from a hip or knee, but whose workup either is not definitive or doesn’t appear “severe enough” to warrant joint replacement.

Sharing Informative Questions and Comments from Our Readers

At The Leone Center for Orthopedic care, my staff and I have created a number of online platforms to provide information and answer patient questions: via email at LeoneCenter@holy-cross.com, our comprehensive website, informational blog and video gallery, both on the website and on You Tube.

Two Computer Systems Improve Total Knee Replacement Surgery

New techniques and technologies have been developed, which include use of sophisticated computers and pressure sensors. These tools have vastly improved the consistency of achieving surgical goals by allowing us to recognize and correct subtleties in balancing the soft tissue sleeve and then optimize limb alignment.

Leading Edge Strategies to Regenerate Hyaline Cartilage

My final blog in this series on biologic strategies for repairing joint damage focuses on leading edge treatments designed to stimulate the regeneration of new hyaline cartilage: Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation (OATS or Mosaicplasty), Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation, Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) and Stem Cell and Tissue engineering.

Arthroscopic Techniques to Stimulate the Production of Joint Fibrocartilage

In the third blog focusing on biologic strategies to preserve, “heal” or encourage the growth of new joint cartilage, I will describe three arthroscopic techniques that deliberately cause bleeding to stimulate the development of fibrocartilage to form and cover an exposed, arthritic area in the joint.

Misconceptions about Partial and Total Knee Replacement

Before considering knee surgery, you and your surgeon must carefully weigh the benefits of partial versus total knee replacement. Although age and physical activity play a role in the decision-making process, by far the most important consideration is the condition of the knee joint.